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Canadian History-Module 3 Activity 3.4 ONLY Learning Activity 3.4-Part 1 & Part
Canadian History-Module 3 Activity 3.4 ONLY Learning Activity 3.4-Part 1 & Part 2 The Staples, Laurentian, and Metropolitan theses are all attempts to explain the historical development of Canada in geographic and economic terms. To understand how they relate to each other and what is distinct about each of the three, it is probably most useful to try to apply them on a small scale. (See Module 3 text for a description of each thesis as well as the associated readings) Part 1- Comparing and Contrasting the Staples, Laurentian, and Metropolitan Theses: Complete the following table in point form, using the prompts for each row to fill in the remaining cells as someone applying that thesis would. Click on the table to download. Prompt Staples – Innis Laurentian – Creighton Metropolitan – Careless The Canadian landscape’s role in Canadian history was to Canadian urban centres were important in Canadian history because they European settlement in Canada took the pattern it did because of Canada remained independent of the United States because Part 2: Applying the Staples, Laurentian, and Metropolitan Theses It seems appropriate to use the development of Sudbury, Ontario, Canada as our example for this exercise. The town of Sudbury was founded in 1883 as part of the construction of the Canadian Pacific Railway. Take a look at the section titled “Development” of the following article: Saarinen, O.W. “Sudbury.” Canadian Encyclopedia. Last modified June 23, 2015. Now, for each of the three theses, write a short paragraph which would explain the initial development of Sudbury (don’t worry about going beyond 1885 – focus on why the town was founded) in the framework of that thesis. As an example, if you were going to use the older “Great Man” theory of history to explain Sudbury’s development, you might write something like this. In this case, the emphasis for the community’s creation is put onto Worthington as the key figure. As the CPR passed through Northern Ontario, depots were required to allow the trains to refuel. It was CPR Superintendent James Worthington who oversaw the establishment of the new community of Sudbury and gave it its name in honour of his wife’s English birthplace. Try to keep each of your three paragraphs to no more than 75-100 words. They do not need to be long. Be sure you clearly identify which thesis is used in which paragraph. Required Resources(Links attaches in Module 3 text) You will be prompted to work through the following resources as you work through this module: Book Chapters Hamel, Jennifer. “The Origins of National History in English Canada.” In “A Brief History of the Writing (and Re-Writing) of Canadian National History.” MA Thesis, University of Saskatchewan, 2009. Spry, Irene M. “Economic History and Economic Theory: Innis’s Insights.” In Harold Innis in the New Century: Reflections and Refractions. Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 1999. Articles Davis, Donald. “The ‘Metropolitan Thesis’ and the Writing of Canadian Urban History.” Urban History Review 14.2 (1985): 95-113. Hamel, Jennifer. “The Origins of National History in English Canada.” In “A Brief History of the Writing (and Re-Writing) of Canadian National History.” MA Thesis, University of Saskatchewan, 2009. Martin, Sandra. “A Giant of Canadian History.” The Globe and Mail April 13, 2009 S10. McKillop, A.B. “Donald Creighton: A Life in History by Donald Wright (review).” The Canadian Historical Review 97.3 (2016): 435-440. Wright, Donald. “CREIGHTON, DONALD GRANT.” In Dictionary of Canadian Biography, vol. 20. University of Toronto/Université Laval. Accessed February 11, 2017. Webpages “Old Messengers, New Media: The Legacy of Innis and McLuhan.” Library and Archives Canada. Last modified March 6, 2007. McKillop, A.B. “Laurentian Thesis.” Canadian Encyclopedia. Last modified March 4, 2015. Important Concepts The following concepts will be explored throughout this module: Staples Thesis Laurentian Thesis Metropolitanism National History Impact of the two world wars on Canadian historiography Note: You should be able to explain these concepts once you have completed the learning activities and readings for this module.

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