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I need links of sources used. I have to read one of the essays in the attached f
I need links of sources used. I have to read one of the essays in the attached files and then do an evaluation of it. For your last paper, I would like you to write an essay in which you evaluate one of the essays provided below (see file). You've all had some sort of an evaluation done either at work or at school: at work, your boss may sit with you and review your performance according to some agreed-upon set of criteria; academically, your grade is an evaluation of all the submitted assignments according to the criteria provided in a rubric. Essays Essays for Paper 4 (1).docx Download Essays for Paper 4 (1).docx A few questions to consider while reading the essay: 1) Is the issue the writer is taking a position on clear? Is there enough evidence to convince you that the problem exists? An issue is the problem concerning which people have different points of view. For example, here's an issue that you are all familiar with: Whether people should be allowed to carry guns on university campuses? So an issue can be a question for which people provide different answers. Some people might say 'Yes," while others might argue 'No.' Whenever you evaluate a position, make sure that the issue/question is clear. 2) What is the writer's position/thesis? Are there any ambiguous words in the thesis that need clarification? Some writers will present their position on some issue explicitly, while others may only imply their position. I would suggest that you read the whole essay carefully before you write down what you think the writer is arguing. 3)What are the major claims (grounds) the writer presents and what evidence does the writer provide to support those claims? Does the writer back up his or her claims? Focus on the argumentative claims the writer makes: For example, if I said that my height is 6 feet, you can easily test that claim by measuring my height. On the other hand, if I said that colleges are stifling free speech, you are likely to ask me a couple of questions: where is the evidence, and what do I mean by stifling? So as you read this essay, try to extract from it the argumentative claims and then ask yourself whether there is evidence that supports the writer's claims. Make sure to look for evidence that supports or challenges the writer's position. If the writer does not provide evidence, then you should not accept the claim. 4) Does the writer provide opposing viewpoints, and argue why he or she disagrees with them? Ask yourself whether the writers engage with the arguments of those who disagree with them. If the writers do not provide an opposing viewpoint, then you should ask yourself whether the opposing viewpoint weakens the writer 5) Do the claims collectively support the writer's thesis? Here's the OUTLINE that you should use to organize your essay: 1) Introduction: Briefly introduce the issue/problem that the writer is identifying. Show the reader why the issue is an important one. At the end of the introduction, present your thesis that is your position on the writers' position. For example: X argues that more and more college students are suffering from anxiety because of A, B and C. X's argument is based on selectively chosen anecdotal evidence and is further weakened by the frequent use of generalizations, faulty causes, and half-truths that collectively prevent him from making a sound argument. Remember, your thesis must tell us what your position is regarding the writers'. 2) Facts regarding the issue: In this section, you should provide evidence to clarify for the reader the scope of the problem. Help the reader understand to what extent the problem/issue is, in fact, a cause for concern. 3) Summary of major claims and evaluation: In this section, you should 1) provide at least FOUR major claims the writer makes to support his or her position, and 2) determine whether the claims are supported by evidence and whether the writer has backed-up the assumptions underpinning the claims/ground. For example, if the writer argues that colleges are trying to silence speech that the colleges think may harm students emotionally, then the writer must provide evidence to convince us that the attempts to censor are taking place on a majority of campuses. If there are no facts to convince the reader that a problem exists, then we don't have to believe the writers. Here's another example: A lot of people believe that cities with large immigrant populations have higher crime rates than do cities that don't have large immigrant communities. Just saying something does not make an argument; you must give me evidence that shows the connection between large immigrant communities and rising crime rate. Facts and statistics. I would suggest you provide one claim per paragraph and then evaluate it by either showing that no evidence is provided to support it or by providing evidence that challenges the claim. If there is more evidence to challenge the writer's claim, then the claim is weakened. 4) Opposing Viewpoint: Ask yourself whether the writer has engaged with the opposing viewpoint? If s/he has not, then provide the opposing argument. 5) Finally, toward the end of your essay, you should make some recommendations to strengthen the writer's argument. Argue what would make the argument stronger; or, you could reject the problem itself by showing that what the writer has argued is based on propaganda and anecdotal evidence, and so on. After reading your essay, the reader should have a clear understanding of the weaknesses of the writer's argument. I've provided below a possible organization of paragraphs to help guide your analysis: Introduction and thesis Facts regarding the issue/problem Summary of writer's overall position Claim 1 Evaluation Claim 2 Evaluation Claim 3 Evaluation Claim 4 Evaluation Opposing Viewpoint Recommendations for improving the argument

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