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feedback Hello Vincent, Strengths. These are the parts of your analysis that I c
feedback Hello Vincent, Strengths. These are the parts of your analysis that I consider the strongest, and why I think so: Your statement that “the student you teach may become a weapon against you” offers good insight into the cultural views of Athens at the time. The threat of knowledge turning dangerous for its creator applies both to Aristophanes’ warning to Socrates (that his students may turn on him) and to Athens’ view of Socrates (as an embodiment of potentially dangerous knowledge and practices). Weaknesses. Let me also mention the parts that I consider the weakest, and explain how I think they could be strengthened: For your support 2, I was unable to find anything on page 76 of Claughton & Affleck that seems to relate to Socrates causing tension through ignoring student needs. Were you meaning his ridicule of Strepsiades on page 67 (line 790)? I think something that could strengthen this position is focusing on the revenge of the single student (Strepsiades), since he did not gang up with others but instead lashed out at Socrates due to a very personal affront. Your paper seems like it is off to a great start! feedback2 Hello Vincent! A strength of your analysis that I found was in your supporting detail 1, where you explain that Aristophanes is a play write that makes satirical pieces. This is important to point out because many of the messages are hiding in the play through aggressive actions and exaggerated emotions. A weakness that I found in your analysis was in supporting detail 2, I would agree with you in saying that Socrates fails to acknowledge his students needs. To strengthen this point, I would take a look at how Socrates' teaching were misdirected and used to justify bad arguments. I believe this lead to the burning of the Thinkery. Preparation: After reading the feedback you got on your Prelim Thesis, carefully weigh that and in response plan to make any necessary adjustments to your thesis as you develop it into your First Analytical Paper. You'll probably also need to plan where and how to expand your thesis with further supporting reasons, points, evidence, or related questions to explore, in order to reach the minimum required length for the paper, and that may entail a bit of re-reading in your notes and in Aristophanes. Format: your name, appropriate title, typed, Times New Roman, 12-point font, double spaced, normal (1-inch) margins, no header or footer, minimum length of 1,000 words (direct quotes used sparingly), plus a works-cited page. Submission: PDF file uploaded to the submission folder in the Assignments tool (chances are that a Word file may also do just fine, but any other file, such as a .pages file, I will probably not be able to open or grade on the course website). Instructions: Please develop your prelim thesis into an analytical paper that is at least 1,000 words. Below are further instructions for every writing component, not all of which will be on the grading rubric, however. These fulsome instructions are meant to reduce any anxiety you may have about the unknown; they aren't meant to overwhelm you. -title. Your title should not only refer to your central question but also at least hint at your answer. Feel free to use a title and a subtitle, separated by a colon. -analysis and evidence. Your analysis or argument should be viable in the academic study of classical literature, that is, it should be open to debate, not obvious, and it should be based on evidence from the text, namely passages from Aristophanes; it should not be based on religious or irreligious truth claims (such as: 'God exists // God does not exist, therefore ....'). In addition to, but not as a substitute for, evidence from the text itself, you’re welcome to bring in material from the intro and notes to Claughton & Affleck's edition of Aristophanes as well as material from Denova. Do not use unapproved online sources: no Wikipedia, Google, etc. The purpose of the assignment is for you to rely on your own critical reading and thinking skills to make your own analysis or argument. I'm interested in what you, not others, have to say about the text. If you want to get into the present-day implications of your topic, what's at stake, for whom, and so on, you definitely can, but be sure to hold that until the concluding paragraph or two; don't lead with that. -organization and flow. You should have a deliberate introduction, body, and conclusion. Each should consist of however many paragraphs are fitting. At the macro level, there should be a conscious sequence of elements, and this sequence should be intuitive to the reader. At the micro level, there should sign-posts to guide the reader (such as first/topic/bridge sentences, key terms and phrases, transitional terms and phrases, pointing words). -citation and works-cited page. You should use MLA style for all citations, and you should cite your source/s in-text. Citations should be consistent. Source/s should be summarized, paraphrased, or quoted appropriately, and any quotations should be smoothly integrated into your writing. Keep direct quotes to a bare minimum; summarize or paraphrase instead, leaving as much room as possible for you and your analysis or argument. You should include a works-cited page at the end of the paper on its own page. Though required, it does not count towards the length of the paper (1,000 words). Here below are some sample entries that you are fee to copy and paste: Claughton, John, and Judith Affleck, eds. Aristophanes: Clouds. Cambridge, 2012. Denova, Rebecca I. Greek and Roman Religions. Wiley-Blackwell, 2019. If you need additional help with MLA style, you go to D2L > Library Tools > Research & Writing Tools > Citation Style Guides > OWL MLA guide. -language usage. You should proof read to make sure your writing is free from sentence-level mistakes (grammar) as well as word-level mistakes (spelling, diction). Grammatical rule breaking, creativity, and neologisms are not off the table, but any instances must be justifiable besides intentional. Your rhetorical style and tone should be appropriate for an academic university setting, and they should comply with the Behavior Policies and Online Etiquette in the Syllabus here. A further note about rhetorical style: this does not mean that you are required to write in ‘academese.’ For instance, if you want to write “My argument is …” instead of “this paper will argue …,” do that. ~ You can revisit the reading from Graff & Birkenstein and their strategies for communicating agreement and disagreement in academic settings, if you like. You can do this instead of a Google search, if you have the urge for additional information besides what's in the edition of the text. You can revisit the tips for avoiding plagiarism here, if you like. You can learn more about how to use the Assignments tool in the D2L Help Pages here. Due Date Jul 30, 2022 11:59 PM Is your paper a minimum length of 1,000 words (direct quotes used sparingly if at all)? 48 points 1,000 words 36 points 750 words 24 points 500 words 12 points 250 words 0 points 0 words Score of Is your paper a minimum length of 1,000 words (direct quotes used sparingly if at all)?,/ 48 Is your analysis or argument based on evidence from the text, not religious or irreligious truth claims? 12 points Yes 9 points Mostly yes 6 points Sort of 3 points Mostly no 0 points No Score of Is your analysis or argument based on evidence from the text, not religious or irreligious truth claims?,/ 12 Do you cite your source/s (MLA style, in-text citation)? 8 points Yes 6 points Mostly yes 4 points Sort of 2 points Mostly no 0 points No Score of Do you cite your source/s (MLA style, in-text citation)?,/ 8 Did you avoid the use of unapproved online sources (Wikipedia, Google, or the like)? 8 points Yes 6 points Mostly yes 4 points Sort of 2 points Mostly no 0 points No Score of Did you avoid the use of unapproved online sources (Wikipedia, Google, or the like)?,/ 8 Do you have a works-cited page (MLA style)? 4 points Yes 3 points Mostly yes 2 points Sort of 1 point Mostly no 0 points No Score of Do you have a works-cited page (MLA style)?,/ 4 Total Score of Analytical Papers,

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