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This is what I posted: Hi Everyone, Thank you for all your feedback on last we
This is what I posted: Hi Everyone, Thank you for all your feedback on last week's post and suggestions on further articles to read and become more knowledgeable about the topic of discussion. I appreciate the help. This week I had obtained Covid 19 for the second time (yea I know fml), so this discussion post came at a perfect time. I watched Ivory Tower while resting and warm tea in hand (yea I know in 90F weather). The film's producers wanted to highlight the flaws of the higher education system. One of the problems is that the overall opinion in the community is that attending college is essential to future success. So what happens if you don't attend college? Are you automatically categorized as a failure in life? In order to pay for higher education, students typically get some type of student loan in addition to grants, scholarships, and/or work-study opportunities. This is all rainbows and butterflies up until the student graduates with a college degree, but with no job or the job market is a disaster. What I mean by a disastrous employment market is, for instance, what occurred in 2012, when there were several protests on Wall Street and people were camped out. Another flaw within the higher education system brought up was how many people think getting a higher degree is like a scam. It was even compared at one time to a never-ending mortgage payment. Despite the fact that the film's director does not make it obvious how change must happen. The simplest practical solution is to lower student loan interest rates. A part of the movie that stood out to me was when one of the interviewers questioned what will happen if they can’t pay off their loan and pass away. Will the loan be passed onto their children to complete paying off. Another part that stood out to me was a concerned parent asking if their child will have a job and move out after obtaining a college degree. These are all questions I ask myself on a daily basis while completing my EdD degree with Rowan University. How long will it take me to pay off everything and be free? Will I be able to help out my children in the future to attend college if they choose to? How can I persuade my children to major in a subject that can guarantee them a job in the future such as becoming a teacher? Can I persuade my children to attend an in-state university instead of out-of-state university all because of the tuition cost...but what if they are admitted to a really good out-of-state university and program...I guess lets rack up the tuition bills and debt. Remember that this movie premiered in 2014. The year is now 2022, and a lot of things have happened since then that weren't even mentioned in the movie. For example, who would have thought that a pandemic and a covid outbreak would lead to virtual learning and teaching? I recall that one of the news stories at the time focused on the question of why students were paying regular tuition prices to enroll in online courses and missing out on the college campus experience. Shouldn't there be a way to lower their tuition costs? Or, why, in this dire situation, isn't the government paying off everyone's debt? If you recall, loans were suspended during that period until further notice. The movie fails to address the issue of whether college is appropriate for everyone. This is an issue that is frequently discussed at my district's departmental and faculty meetings. Although it is true that not everyone wants to attend college, this does not prevent a student from changing their mind in the future. We give the students several chances to enroll in AP and Dual Enrollment classes. Because of this, the vast majority of my district's graduating students get nine to fifteen college credits. This not only saves the students time, but also lessens the financial load they will have to bear if they choose to attend college. Along with those college credits, we give the students several chances to earn certifications in fields like phlebotomy, police dispatcher, emergency medical technician, etc. We had career week before the academic year ended in June. A fire fighter was one of the presenters. My students discovered during that presentation that fire fighters receive a pension from the government, as well as information on their job schedule, health benefits, and other topics. Many of my students were pleased about this since the flexible work schedule allowed many fire fighters to simultaneously pursue careers as plumbers, HVAC system specialists, electricians, etc. Or they may be a landlord, managing several homes and looking out for their tenants. ... and so on. This is just one example as to you don’t need to attend a four year university in order to be successful, but it will still require a lot of hustling and won’t be easy to obtain. Sorry Professor, I know you said 1 paragraph, but this is one of those topics as I'm sure you know ... is there a right or wrong answer and will it ever be resolved in the future? This Is what my classmate responded: After viewing the film The Ivory Tower, I have recognized how the students themselves are the biggest consumer, and unfortunate victims, when it comes to the marketized higher education experience. However, this consumer is unfortunately reaping the negative effects of the marketization process within higher education systems today. This film highlighted the sad reality of the student loan debt crisis in which students become the ones who take on this burden for the pursuit of prestigious higher education experiences (both academic and social) at the expense of lowered federal funding over the past few years for colleges and universities (Rossi, 2014). Throughout viewing this film, I kept thinking about Tight’s (2013) publication that focuses on the student as one of the biggest stakeholders in the marketization process of the higher education system. Students are targeted in predatory ways by colleges and universities across our nation, leaving them vulnerable to financial burdens they must take on to fund their educational endeavors. Many students interviewed throughout the film expressed how they struggle to justify funding their education in today’s financial market, leaving them with either the option of taking on thousands of dollars in student loans or finding avenues to get direct work and real-life experiences (Rossi, 2014). Higher education schools, such as Deep Springs College and The Cooper Union, demonstrate that students can pursue a higher education degree with little to no costs, if they seek avenues such as these institutions offer that could work best for them (Rossi, 2014). However, receiving a free education is not the end-all-be-all option for every student in the United States. Within my own practice, my education philosophy is supported by the concept that education itself cannot be a transactional exchange between student and teacher, or even student and the college/university they attend (Freire, 1968). Rather, students need to view their higher education pursuits as one that helps promote critical thinking and personal inquiry that enables them to become contributing members to society in their field of work to make real and lasting change, whatever career path they may choose (Giroux, 2002). At times, I felt that this film somewhat discouraged students from considering the benefits of pursuing a higher education degree and experience. But towards the end, I found traces of hope from students interviewed that their college and/or university experience has helped them discover who they want to become and the change they aspire to make in the world once leaving the post-secondary realm. Although my student loan debt has continuously grown throughout my undergraduate and graduate studies, I hope my own collegiate experience that I talk to my college-level students about each year can encourage them to view their own college degree as a door for new and promising opportunities to come. References: Freire, P. (1968). Pedagogy of the Oppressed. Bloomsbury Academic. Giroux, H. A. (2002). Neoliberalism, corporate culture, and the promise of higher education: The university as a democratic public sphere. Harvard Education Review, 72(4), 425-463. Tight, M. (2013). Students: Customers, clients or pawns? Higher Education Policy, 26(1), 291-307. Giroux, H. A. (2002). Neoliberalism, corporate culture, and the promise of higher education: The university as a democratic public sphere. Harvard Educational Review 72(4), 425- Lynch, K. (2006). Neoliberalism and marketisation: The implications for higher education. European Educational Research Journal 5(1), 1-17. Rossi, A. (Director). (2014). Ivory tower [film]. CNN Films. Can you type a response to my classmate and use her references. About 2 to 3 paragraphs, single spaced, 1 to 2 citations per paragraph. Thank you.

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